Can your humi temp be too low??

FN in MT

Gorilla
My basement is finished, does not have water/humidity issues, but unless I heat it....it's quite cool most of the time. Currently we are at 48-50 degrees. In the summer it seldom goes above 65 unless I open the outside doors or a window.

Will I have issues with my humidor as my Man Cave IS the basement. And...what should I set my humidity at considering the low temp??

Fn in MT
 

Bear

SilverBear
My basement is finished, does not have water/humidity issues, but unless I heat it....it's quite cool most of the time. Currently we are at 48-50 degrees. In the summer it seldom goes above 65 unless I open the outside doors or a window.

Will I have issues with my humidor as my Man Cave IS the basement. And...what should I set my humidity at considering the low temp??

Fn in MT

I don't see anything wrong with the lower temp, but I'm by no means an expert on the topic...
FWIW bump to the top in hopes that someone who knows sees this and answers.

Great question. :tu
 

SilverFox

Seven Down 33 to Go
Lower temp means a slower aging process for your cigars. Based on what I just read in the Minn Encyclopedia, the humidity is the larger concern.
 

FN in MT

Gorilla
Thanks for the replies.....should have the new Aristocrat by the end of the month........with any Luck and some speedy Truckers. :tu

FN in MT:cb
 

BostonMark

Lowland Gorilla
Because RH is so directly related to temp, you may find that it is harder to keep it as high as 65% at a lower temp, but if you can get it that high then go for it.
 

jkorp

·~«{·B'lieve Hon·}»~·
The only thing to watch at the 48-50 range is your humidity. It gets hard to stabalize RH this cold. If your using a cooler or something plastic and air tight you'll be fine. If you are using a wood humi that breaths you'll just need to keep and eye on it. :2
 

Martix_agent

Young Ape
The only thing to watch at the 48-50 range is your humidity. It gets hard to stabalize RH this cold. If your using a cooler or something plastic and air tight you'll be fine. If you are using a wood humi that breaths you'll just need to keep and eye on it. :2
how would you go about solving the low RH problem at a low temperature? As far as I know, it's not possible once the RH is maxed out, correct?
 

lenguamor

Gorila Cabrón
If you're aging for the long run, (years) that is fine.

Just be vigilant if your area experiences a sudden temperature rise; the sticks in the cabinet will retain the cold longer than the rising temp outside the box, causing condensation. It can be a real problem for both the sticks and the humidor.
 

pinoyman

Alpha Silverback
My basement is finished, does not have water/humidity issues, but unless I heat it....it's quite cool most of the time. Currently we are at 48-50 degrees. In the summer it seldom goes above 65 unless I open the outside doors or a window.

Will I have issues with my humidor as my Man Cave IS the basement. And...what should I set my humidity at considering the low temp??

Fn in MT

although cooler storage temperatures are definitely not a problem for cigars (as long as you maintain a reasonable relative humidity).

Why do we attempt to keep them at 70 deg. then? The key is in the subtle difference between stable storage and true aging. Your cigars will not age, mature, mellow, or develop the complex character of well cured smokes at lower temperatures. The blended tobaccos will not "marry", and if you're keeping them for a long time you won't get the subtle changes in flavor.

There have been several long threads in a.s.c. on the need to age La Gloria Cubanas, for example. These will stay "green" much longer if aged at cooler temperatures.

At higher temperatures, there are several insects to worry about. The microscopic eggs of the dreaded tobacco beetle, for instance, hatch at temperatures above 80 degrees.
You can use 65 humi. beads, it'll help a lot keeping the rh.
 

mash

Evolving Lead Gorilla
With an Aristocrat I don't think you'll have to worry about keeping the RH where you want it. You might find though that you have to refill the reservoir fairly often, you can add lots of water to those things. Just add more so you won't run out as quick.
 

TheEconomist

ChestBeater
Actually it does matter if it is too low. Most people have a misconception of what relative humidity is...

Relative humidity is not simply the amount of water in the air..

For example.. if your hygrometer reads 100% at 20 degrees celcius, there will be 15 grams of water per killogram of air in the air. If you are at 30 Celcius, 100% would be about 27 grams of water per killogram.

Therefore if is 50 degrees, even if the relative humidity says it is at 65%, the air won't have as much water in it as it would if it said 65% at 70 degrees.

this would result in a dryer cigar...
 

Scimmia

Unknown Specimen
Actually it does matter if it is too low. Most people have a misconception of what relative humidity is...

Relative humidity is not simply the amount of water in the air..

For example.. if your hygrometer reads 100% at 20 degrees celcius, there will be 15 grams of water per killogram of air in the air. If you are at 30 Celcius, 100% would be about 27 grams of water per killogram.

Therefore if is 50 degrees, even if the relative humidity says it is at 65%, the air won't have as much water in it as it would if it said 65% at 70 degrees.

this would result in a dryer cigar...

We really do need a "beating your head against a wall" smiley like I've seen on other forums.

TheEconomist, please do a search, as absolute humidity really has nothing to do with moisture content in your cigars.
 

TheEconomist

ChestBeater
I'm sorry? I was talking about relative humidity

relative humidity keeps cigars from drying out and from growing mold.. If you put a sponge in a refrigerator at 100% RH at 35degrees, it won't come out wet... If you put it into a oven at 300 degrees and at 100% RH, it will come out very wet...


Relative Humidity=The amount of water vapor present in the atmosphere expressed as a percentage of the maximum that could be present at the same temperature.

Absolute humidity=The mass of water vapor in a given volume of air. It represents the density of water vapor in the air.
 
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Scimmia

Unknown Specimen
What you're talking about, keeping the same amount of water in the air, is maintaining a constant absolute humidity.

The part that's missing is that keeping a constant vapor pressure of water while dramically changing the temperature, and therefor changing the evaporation rate, will not yield the results that you're looking for.

As for your sponge comment, if you put a wet sponge in either with 100% RH, your net evaporation will be 0, or very near 0, so yes, it would come out wet in either case.

Edit, I'm sorry, you said per kg of air, so you were talking about specific humidity, not absolute humidity. Either way, it doesn't work.
 

TheEconomist

ChestBeater
what about a dry sponge?

bear with me and tell me if im still wrong..

I'm trying to think through this...

putting a dry object into a certain situation it would matter, but a damp one it wouldn't, am i correct? because if the air is at 100% humidity, that means it can't evaporate anymore. But could the sponge pick more moisture up?

The one in the cooler would behave the same, but it most likely wouldn't beable to pick anymore up because of the absolute humidity not allowing it to do so..
 

Scimmia

Unknown Specimen
The sponge will reach Equilibrium Moisture Content (EMC) in either situation, but it won't really be wet (as in dripping) in either. It won't go past that stage until you start dropping the temp and net evaporation goes negative. Now, if you want to talk about how much water is EMC at each point, I think we need to bring up Vapor Pressure Deficit (VPD). I never said that EMC was directly related to RH, but it's a FAR closer relationship than Absolute or Specific Humidity.
 

TheEconomist

ChestBeater
see but now this is where it goes back to making no sense, hence my first explanation.

If emc of an object changes with both temperature and Relative humidity, that would show that they have a strong inverse relationship. If one goes up, the other should come down. (in order to keep the same EMC)

And i can totally see how EMC would be the most important thing in a cigar... right? how much moisture that tobacco should be holding...

haha, oh boy, i can't seem to logic my way into thinking that this is incorrect..
and I'll be in law school soon...

either i'm in trouble or we need a scientist
 
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