I have discovered low humidity!

lightning9191

Evolving Lead Gorilla
from MinRonee: "Interesting note:
65°F = ~ 18°C. Comfortable room temperature is ~ 24 – 25 °C, which is ~75°F to 77°F"


My home office (where I store cigars) stays at around 65 degrees during all seasons and I find it quite comfortable.

I would think 75 to 77 degrees would feel very warm.
I think what you consider comfortable temperatures varies on where you were born and raised. I'm from northern PA and it is noticeable down here. In the fall, when everyone else has their parkas on, I only have a sweatshirt. I enjoy air conditioning in the summer. The heat down here is brutal some days compared to home.
 

sacmore21

ChestBeater
I just wish I wasn't so scared to try this out. I was always brought up in the 70% humidity world. And while I knew all of the touting of lower humidities on the forum, when it came time to get beads, I just couldn't pull the trigger on the 65%. I've heard that storing it lower allows the oils to dry out, especially for long term aging. Since I can't smoke as frequently as I want, I always assume my cigars are in for long term aging. Although, I've never really found burning issues with 70%. The obvious fix would be to dry box things before you smoke them, but who has time for that? :ss So, I'm glad that the lower humidity is working for you. Perhaps, someday, I'll be able to be brave like you. Until then, I'll be :chk:D
 

oldforge

Gorilla
My suggestion would be to take out a few smokes from a cheap bundle (maduros would be best) and experiment with a dry box for a few days or a week.

(You do have a cheap bundle, right? :) )



I just wish I wasn't so scared to try this out. I was always brought up in the 70% humidity world. And while I knew all of the touting of lower humidities on the forum, when it came time to get beads, I just couldn't pull the trigger on the 65%. I've heard that storing it lower allows the oils to dry out, especially for long term aging. Since I can't smoke as frequently as I want, I always assume my cigars are in for long term aging. Although, I've never really found burning issues with 70%. The obvious fix would be to dry box things before you smoke them, but who has time for that?
 

PUFFNMO

Lowland Gorilla
I also converted to lower humidity in the last few weeks. My storage unit fluctuates between 60 - 65%, and smoking has become much easier and more enjoyable.
I can smoke more slowly and not worry about the cigar going out. The draw is better, the flavors are better. I am starting to appreciate some of the cigars I had written off as too strong.
Anybody who hasn't done this, give it a try. Cheers.
 

sacmore21

ChestBeater
My suggestion would be to take out a few smokes from a cheap bundle (maduros would be best) and experiment with a dry box for a few days or a week.

(You do have a cheap bundle, right? :) )
No, but I am taking donations :D Although, I do think your point's valid. Maybe someday.....
 

PUFFNMO

Lowland Gorilla
Sub 70% RH levels can cause dehydration of oils etc. In other words LONG TERM storage should be above 70% RH. Low RH could negatively affect the long term aging process, and cause the slow disappearance of flavours.
SHORT TERM storage could be done at a lower RH. A lot of people use a "dry box" with, for example, a RH of 65% or lower. Just be careful switching from a dry box to a higher humidity as the wrapper might crack.
So ideally long-term storage at a minimum of 70%, and a dry box for the "soon to be smoked" cigars.
Misha - I have to disagree. Cigars do not crack when going from dry to wet. It's the other way around. A wet cigar in a dry environment will crack.

The wrapper is the first thing to be affected by humidity or dryness, because it is on the outside of the cigar. The wrapper will shrink or expand almost instantly in reaction to the air around it. The filler does not react very fast at all, as it is insulated by the outer wrap.

So - take a dry cigar into damp air, the wrapper will loosen from absorbing humidity. Not a problem. Take a wet cigar into dry air and the wrapper will shrink as the moisture abrubtly leaves it. The filler stays the same and the wrapper cracks. Cheers.
 

DonnieW

Rookie S.O.B.
Misha - I have to disagree. Cigars do not crack when going from dry to wet. It's the other way around. A wet cigar in a dry environment will crack.

The wrapper is the first thing to be affected by humidity or dryness, because it is on the outside of the cigar. The wrapper will shrink or expand almost instantly in reaction to the air around it. The filler does not react very fast at all, as it is insulated by the outer wrap.

So - take a dry cigar into damp air, the wrapper will loosen from absorbing humidity. Not a problem. Take a wet cigar into dry air and the wrapper will shrink as the moisture abrubtly leaves it. The filler stays the same and the wrapper cracks. Cheers.
You both have a point. I've personally observed what Misha is saying. If something is too dry and you drop it into a ≥ 70% RH box, you may see wrapper cracks. On the other hand, we all know what happens when you try to smoke a damp stick in really dry weather - especially big RG cigars... KERRRRACK!! But what the hell do I know... I'm only 15.
 
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DSTRBD

Young Ape
When it dries, it shrinks. When its wet it expands. I could see cracks happening either way, but more likely from the shrinking due to dryness.
 

Misha

Young Ape
Misha - I have to disagree. Cigars do not crack when going from dry to wet. It's the other way around. A wet cigar in a dry environment will crack.

The wrapper is the first thing to be affected by humidity or dryness, because it is on the outside of the cigar. The wrapper will shrink or expand almost instantly in reaction to the air around it. The filler does not react very fast at all, as it is insulated by the outer wrap.

So - take a dry cigar into damp air, the wrapper will loosen from absorbing humidity. Not a problem. Take a wet cigar into dry air and the wrapper will shrink as the moisture abrubtly leaves it. The filler stays the same and the wrapper cracks. Cheers.
I know it doesn't sound logical, but it has happened a few times to me. Basically because i am an A$$ I tend to forget that it happened and put a "dry" (65-68%) cigar in a "wet" (72-75%) cabinet. And then it cracks open :mad:.

Im guessing the reason for this is that the wrapper condenses and expands (it grows thicker and thinner, kinda like when you over eat :D)
 

PUFFNMO

Lowland Gorilla
I know it doesn't sound logical, but it has happened a few times to me. Basically because i am an A$$ I tend to forget that it happened and put a "dry" (65-68%) cigar in a "wet" (72-75%) cabinet. And then it cracks open :mad:.

Im guessing the reason for this is that the wrapper condenses and expands (it grows thicker and thinner, kinda like when you over eat :D)
Misha and Donnie - Interesting. I haven't experienced what you describe, but then I live in L.A.

Maybe the bottom line is that cigars do not like sudden change.

Donnie - 15 you say??? You have a good 80 years of cigar smoking ahead of you. And it's not too soon to start putting away a few good boxes!
 

Rolando

alliroG
I know it doesn't sound logical, but it has happened a few times to me. Basically because i am an A$$ I tend to forget that it happened and put a "dry" (65-68%) cigar in a "wet" (72-75%) cabinet. And then it cracks open :mad:.

Im guessing the reason for this is that the wrapper condenses and expands (it grows thicker and thinner, kinda like when you over eat :D)

If you originally stored it at 72-75 without problem you may be overworking your wrappers. The main reason why people are so crazy about beads is that they maintain a constant humidity which keeps the wrapper from expanding and contracting due to slight variations in rh. Cigars are not terribly fragile but long term storage at varying rh's can stress them especially at a higher humidity. If you feel like you are getting better results for you at 72-75 you might want to try and stabilize more.
 

orca99usa

Gorilla
My humidor runs between 63 and 66 percent for the most part. When it heads south of 62 it's time to recharge. My sticks smoke great at that RH.
 

OSIRIS

Tree Dwelling Ninja
Actually, the cigar peeps say 70% for NCs and 65% for Cubans. I keep my cigars at 63%, and much prefer how they taste and smoke at that RH. :)
Yup mine are at around 62% that's how I like them, almost never have a burn issue. Besides that if they are good when you smoke them then that is all that matters.
 

longknocker

SilverBack
I have been a closet 70% rh guy. I don't know why, except I worry about my cigars drying out and cracking. My cooler is at 70% right now. But my desktop was dropping and I thought "meh, let's see what happens." It is at around 65% now and has been for a few weeks.

Let me say that my cigars have been smoking GREAT! Last night I had one of my favorites, a Pepin blue label, and it was better than ever before. I mean that literally, it was better than ever!

I have been converted.
I thought the same thing last year; but, like you, I learned! 60-65% for all my smokes, now!:tu
 

MrMoJoe

Young Ape
I've got a jar of 70% Madeline Crystals in my 50-count humi, and a sponge disk. I only had the disk at first, but even after a second seasoning I still could not get the level above 65, so being a newb who feared anything less than 70, I added the jar.

Now, with both devices, the level stays very consistently @ 63-64 (digital hygrometer). While my humi may have a bad seal (or not ?), I quit worrying about it after reading this forum. All of my sticks, including ones that have been in there for months, smoke and taste just fine with no cracks or indication of being too dry.

While there may be a "perfect" level, and there are certainly limits on both ends of the scale, I suspect the acceptable range is greater than many think it is for most smokes.
 

Rolando

alliroG
I've got a jar of 70% Madeline Crystals in my 50-count humi, and a sponge disk. I only had the disk at first, but even after a second seasoning I still could not get the level above 65, so being a newb who feared anything less than 70, I added the jar.

Now, with both devices, the level stays very consistently @ 63-64 (digital hygrometer). While my humi may have a bad seal (or not ?),

How long have you had the humi? A bad seal is not much of an issue in the summer where it is humid but come winter you might have a fight on your hands. I live in ga and with a good seal on both of my humis most summers go by without ever adding water.
 
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